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Drink Only Irish Beers For St Patty’s!

 

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Here’s our selection of all of the Irish Beers you should try on Saint Patty’s Day! Don’t worry, they don’t have to be all green :)

Start your day with a breakfast of champions. A “meal in a bottle”, also known as the Guinness! Rich, creamy and dark. Roasted malt flavor and hints of chocolate all satisfying flavors for a connoisseur. Ask your bartender for a “perfect pint,” an optimal pouring method which, according to the company, should take 119.53 seconds.

Guinness-Varieties

 

The lightest and sweetest between the three previous. Think chocolate milk topped with a double shot of espresso and finished with a one-inch thick head of caramel-infused creamy goodness. Save this Murphy’s for dessert!
Murphys-Irish-Stout-

Often compared to Guinness, Beamish is dark and chocolaty. Sweet flavors of caramel and hints of coffee balance out the bitter, hoppy finish. Beamish yeast dates back to 1792 to capture the traditional taste of stout from Ireland.

Beamish-Irish-Stout

Smithwick’s, Ireland’s oldest brewery, is where it originated. The beer is older than some countries, with a heritage dating back to the fourteenth century, and until recently, Dubliner Pub in Washington. With a base flavor similar to Smithwick’s with less hops, the distinct smooth and white head. The amber brew has the rich aroma and flavor of toasted malt. It’s all at once sweet and creamy.

Kilkenny-Irish-Cream-Ale
Harp, a crisp summery lager, which comes from a country better known for its stouts and leprechauns, has a bitter beginning that quickly that turns to clean and refreshing. This classic lager is smooth and solid.

Harp-Lager

 

This beer is so old, it dates back to the fourteenth century when monks would brew their own next door to the Smithwick’s brewery. The ruins of the original Franciscan abbey that once stood there can still be seen. Smithwick’s is Ireland’s oldest operating brewery, the major ale producer in Ireland and, along with Guinness, part of Diageo. This is a red ale characterized by caramel maltiness. It captures a unique flavor that combines its hops with sweet aromatic fruits and deep malt, coffee and roasted barley notes.

Smithwicks-Ale

The History Behind Green Beer!

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Today’s St Patrick’s Day!

St Patrick’s Day celebrations have been greatly influenced by those that developed among the Irish diaspora, especially in North America.

Parties involve public parades and festivals, céilithe (Irish traditional music sessions), and the wearing of green attire or shamrocks. There are also formal gatherings such as banquets and dances, although these were more common in the past. St Patrick’s Day parades began in North America in the 18th century but did not spread to Ireland until the 20th century. The participants include marching bands, the military, fire brigades, cultural organisations, charitable organisations, voluntary associationsyouth groupsfraternities, and so on. However, over time, many of the parades have become more akin to a carnival. More effort is made to use the Irish language; especially in Ireland, where the week of St Patrick’s Day is “Irish language week.” Recently, famous landmarks have been lit up in green on St Patrick’s Day.

 

Why All The Green?

On St Patrick’s Day, it is customary to wear shamrocks and green clothing or accessories. St Patrick is said to have used the shamrock, a three-leaved plant, to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagan Irish.

A green beer is poured from a tap during the Pub Crawl Saturday, March 14, 2015 at Lynch's Irish Tavern in downtown Port Huron,  Mich. (AP Photo/The Port Huron Times Herald, Jeffrey M. Smith)

A green beer at Lynch’s Irish Tavern. (AP Photo/The Port Huron Times Herald, Jeffrey M. Smith)

The colour green has been associated with Ireland since at least the 1640s when the green harp flag was used by the Irish Catholic Confederation. Green ribbons and shamrocks have been worn on St Patrick’s Day since at least the 1680s. The Friendly Brothers of St Patrick, an Irish fraternity founded in about 1750, adopted green as its colour.  During the 1790s, Green would become associated with

During the 1790s, Green would become associated with Irish nationalism, due to its use by the United Irishmen. This was a republican organisation—led mostly by Protestants but with many Catholic members—who launched a rebellion in 1798 against British rule. The phrase “wearing of the green” comes from a song of the same name, which laments United Irishmen supporters being persecuted for wearing green. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, the colour green and its association with St Patrick’s Day grew.

 

So there you have it, as long as you wear a green beer for St Patty’s you are all good to partake in the celebrations!!!