Tag Archives: alcohol

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Better Technology Equals Better Beer!

The four most produced grains around the world are in order corn, rice, wheat, and barley. Barley is the essential ingredient of two of the best drinks know to men: Beer and Whiskey! In 2014, we produced 144 million tons of barley.

In 2012, the grain’s genome was mapped for the first time by the International Barley Genome Sequencing Consortium! See it here. This discovery leads researchers to believe that we could grow a much better-engineered barley grain.

Why do you want better barley?

Adam Rogers  one of Wired‘s articles editor said: “But barley has a quality other grains don’t. It’s possible to induce it to make an enzyme, alpha-amylase, that breaks starch into ready-to-use sugar. The process of coaxing that enzyme out is called malting, and malted barley is what you use to make beer—even if you’re adding in other grains like corn or rice, as major American brewers do. The enzyme in the malt turns those grains’ starches into sugar, too, and that’s what yeast converts to alcohol.”

Better barley equals better beer, and probably even more beer!

Drink Only Irish Beers For St Patty’s!

 

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Here’s our selection of all of the Irish Beers you should try on Saint Patty’s Day! Don’t worry, they don’t have to be all green :)

Start your day with a breakfast of champions. A “meal in a bottle”, also known as the Guinness! Rich, creamy and dark. Roasted malt flavor and hints of chocolate all satisfying flavors for a connoisseur. Ask your bartender for a “perfect pint,” an optimal pouring method which, according to the company, should take 119.53 seconds.

Guinness-Varieties

 

The lightest and sweetest between the three previous. Think chocolate milk topped with a double shot of espresso and finished with a one-inch thick head of caramel-infused creamy goodness. Save this Murphy’s for dessert!
Murphys-Irish-Stout-

Often compared to Guinness, Beamish is dark and chocolaty. Sweet flavors of caramel and hints of coffee balance out the bitter, hoppy finish. Beamish yeast dates back to 1792 to capture the traditional taste of stout from Ireland.

Beamish-Irish-Stout

Smithwick’s, Ireland’s oldest brewery, is where it originated. The beer is older than some countries, with a heritage dating back to the fourteenth century, and until recently, Dubliner Pub in Washington. With a base flavor similar to Smithwick’s with less hops, the distinct smooth and white head. The amber brew has the rich aroma and flavor of toasted malt. It’s all at once sweet and creamy.

Kilkenny-Irish-Cream-Ale
Harp, a crisp summery lager, which comes from a country better known for its stouts and leprechauns, has a bitter beginning that quickly that turns to clean and refreshing. This classic lager is smooth and solid.

Harp-Lager

 

This beer is so old, it dates back to the fourteenth century when monks would brew their own next door to the Smithwick’s brewery. The ruins of the original Franciscan abbey that once stood there can still be seen. Smithwick’s is Ireland’s oldest operating brewery, the major ale producer in Ireland and, along with Guinness, part of Diageo. This is a red ale characterized by caramel maltiness. It captures a unique flavor that combines its hops with sweet aromatic fruits and deep malt, coffee and roasted barley notes.

Smithwicks-Ale